The Current Landscape of Film Archiving and How Study Programs Can Contribute

Adelheid Heftberger

Abstract


In this paper I will start by describing film archives at the current situation as they move from analogue to digital. Meanwhile new educational programs in Germany have been set up to prepare the next generation of film archivists for their task. I will discuss my views on how study programs can support them and what they could usefully add to their current offerings. In addition to that I will outline possible intersections for scholarly collaboration, particularly how computer sciences or digital humanists can support film archivists. initially to describe the situation of film archives as they move from analogue to digital. After that I will discuss future film archivists, my views on how study programs can support them and what they could usefully add to their current offerings. My suggestions for additional subjects in the curricula might not always be the most obvious, but hopefully my reasons will become clear. Finally, I will outline possible intersections for scholarly collaboration, where for example computer sciences (or digital humanists) can support film archives.


References


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